1887
Volume 14, Issue 1
  • ISSN 1932-2798
  • E-ISSN: 1876-2700
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Abstract

Abstract

The present research explores how the self-censoring mechanism is established in the translator’s mind and how this internal mechanism interfaces with external, institutional censorial policies to affect both the process and the outcome of a translation. The paper begins with a discussion of the ubiquitous nature of censorship and how the translator internalizes various coercive censorial forces. Based on detailed case studies of three well-known censorship/ self-censorship-affected Chinese translations – those of , and  – this research finds that when certain values, ideologies, cultural practices and moral presuppositions become internalized by translators, their censorial behavior is no longer a coerced option but an active choice of their own, and also that there is often no clear dividing line between what is coerced (censoring) and what is one’s own (self-censoring) action in contexts where ‘politically/ culturally sensitive’ source texts are bound to be scrutinized by the censor’s/ self-censor’s eye before they enter the translations market.

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2019-04-05
2019-09-19
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): censorship , Chinese context , cultural politics , fuzzy interface and self-censorship
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