1887
Volume 7, Issue 1
  • ISSN 2211-3711
  • E-ISSN: 2211-372X
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Abstract

Emanating from the recent sociological turn of translation studies scholarship ( Wolf 2006 , 2007 , 2009 and 2010 ), translation and interpreting practices in non-governmental organizations has become a field of research that imperatively requires cross-disciplinary approaches. This paper investigates multilingual initiatives carried out by the Human Rights Investigation Lab (HRIL) and Translators Without Borders (TWB) and their contribution to ensuring language access in crisis scenarios. Based on interviews with delegates from both organizations, and taking into consideration legal and sociological perspectives, it sets out a broad reflection on how translation studies research is evolving in the area of NGOs. It intends to address the caveats that can arise from both conceptual and empirical approaches in the design of future projects, as it explores the notion of discipline-specific knowledge and relevant concepts in translation training and external collaborations.

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2018-08-10
2019-10-20
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